Coffee Drinkers Have Lower Melanoma Risk

An article published on January 20, 2015 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute reveals the finding of Erikka Loftfield, MPH, and her colleagues of an association between increased coffee consumption and a reduced risk of malignant melanoma.

The analysis included 447,357 participants in the National Institutes of Health-AARP prospective study initiated in 1995-1996. Dietary questionnaires completed upon enrollment were evaluated for the intake of regular and decaffeinated coffee. The subjects were followed for a median of 10.5 years, during which 2,904 cases of malignant melanoma were diagnosed.

A trend was observed between increasing coffee intake and a decreasing risk of malignant melanoma over follow-up. Among men and women who consumed four or more cups of coffee per day, there was an adjusted 20% lower risk of developing malignant melanoma in comparison with the risk experienced by those who were non-coffee drinkers. The protective effect of coffee drinking was observed only in association with coffee that was not decaffeinated and was restricted to those with malignant melanoma as opposed to melanoma in situ.

In their discussion of the findings, the authors suggest several mechanisms to explain the protective effect of coffee against malignant melanoma. “Coffee contains numerous bioactive compounds, including polyphenols, diterpenes, trigonelline, and caffeine,” they write. “The predominant chlorogenic acid in coffee, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and to a greater extent its metabolite caffeic acid, have been shown to suppress UVB-induced skin carcinogenesis in mouse epidermal cells by inhibiting cyclooxygenase (COX-2) expression. COX-2, which is overexpressed in response to UVB exposure and in human melanoma cells compared with normal melanocytes, is thought to play a functional role in the development and progression of malignant melanoma.”

“Because of its high disease burden, lifestyle modifications with even modest protective effects may have a meaningful impact on melanoma morbidity,” they conclude.

References
Life Extension (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.lifeextension.com/WhatsHot/2015/1/January-Whats-Hot-Articles/Page-01?utm_source=eNewsletter_EZX500E&utm_medium=email&utm_term=WhatsHot&utm_content=Header&utm_campaign=2015Wk19&l=0#Coffee-drinkers-have-lower-melanoma-risk

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Introducing to Popular Yacon Syrup!

We’re glad that the Most Popular Yacon Syrup is Now In Stock!

Probiotic Sweetener with Low Glycemic Index!

Yacon is a distant relative of the sunflower with edible tubers and leaves. The syrup from this sweet root is raising eyebrows in the medical community and natural product world for its medicinal qualities. It contains fructooligosaccharides (FOS), which pass through the digestive track unmetabolized, providing few calories. The sugars, however, are metabolized by the bifidobacteria in the large intestine and contribute to improved digestions and absorption of vitamins, such as B-complex. The undigested portion of yacon serves as prebiotic-food for ‘friendly’ bacteria. Other benefits of FOS supplementation include increased production of beneficial short-chain fatty acids, such as butyrate, increased absorption of calcium and magnesium and improved elimination of toxic compounds. Preclinical studies indicate an increase in bone density after consumption of FOS. It may help diabetics regulate and normalize glucose levels in the blood due to its FOS content. It is considered hypoglycemic and holds promise as a sweetener for diabetics and others who choose not to consume sugar.

Traditional Ethnobotanical Information

This delicious root crop has been grown in the Andes by the Inca and their descendants. Related to sunflowers, Yacon has large succulent roots that have a juicy, watermelon flavor. From this we produce an exceptionally sweet syrup which can be used like honey or maple syrup.

You hold in your hands the finest traditional botanical available on earth. This botanical is a long standing favorite in South America where it has been empirically selected for its effectiveness over many generations. Only organically cultivated or sustainably wild harvested plants are collected and shipped to our laboratories.

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